26 After School Activities PLR Articles

after school activities plr articles

Here are the 26 article titles in this After school activities PLR Articles Pack:

After school activities and burnout – 219 words

After school activities and relationship building – 227 words

After school activities for the overweight – 219 words

After school activity for the hyperactive child – 465 words

After school program – recreational vs. educational – 462 words

After school programs and discipline – 212 words

After school safety – tips and reminders – 225 words

A home-based after school program – 437 words

Art-based activities – 221 words

Benefits of a good after school program – 484 words

Boring after school activities – 464 words

Developmental after school programs – 430 words

Effective after school activities – 490 words

How much is too much? – 525 words

How to find after school activities – 214 words

Keeping children motivated – 195 words

Need for after school activities – 432 words

Over-scheduling kids – 213 words

Potentials of after school programs – 226 words

Quirky after school programs – 226 words

Reading activities – 216 words

Recreational after school programs – 422 words

School based after-school programs – 411 words

Successful after school programs – 213 words

The Learning environment – 489 words

Too much of school – 453 words

Here is one of the After School Activities PLR Article Sample

Article title: How much is too much?

Should your child go for the football practice 5 days a week? Are 3 days enough? It is common for parents to be a little confused when it comes to deciding how much is too much with reference to after school activities. They argue that since most of the activities are fun (as different from studies), children will simply lap up these classes. But, too much of fun can also make a child sick. Here is a simple guide that will help you decide how much is too much for your child.

Kindergarten:
Your child is just beginning to learn to interact and get used to discipline. His or her after-school life should be simple and carefree. One or two classes per week are enough at the beginning. Once the child settles down, look for more challenging activities like a music program.

Grade 1:
One or two activities per week, play dates and playground visits are recommended. Avoid competitive sports activities. The child is still too young to have to worry about winning and losing. After the rigors of a full day at school, he or she needs a healthy outlet for pent up energy.
Physical activities and noncompetitive sports are best for this age.

Grade 2:
Your child is old enough to voice opinions on what activities he or she wants. Sports, skating, swimming or computers – steer him towards things he likes. Many children begin lessons on a musical instrument around this age. But, allow your child some ‘alone time’ during which he can unwind and just do whatever he wishes.

Grade 3:
Socialization begins to take center stage. Team sports are a good choice. Developing motor skills, painting, drawing etc are good too. Let the child explore areas of interests. But leave aside enough time for the family and for fun activities.

Grade 4:
At this age, the child will tell you what he likes. He needs to get involved in activities that will boost his confidence. This will also help him manage stress as this is the time when social pressure is beginning to build. But, beware of the homework demon. Your child needs more time with his studies. Balancing his schoolwork with other activities is very important.

Grade 5:
The fifth grader is bubbling with energy and will want to do just about everything. But she or he may conveniently push studies to the background. So, close supervision is needed. Keep one or two days free for family time and other activities. Now is a great time to get your child interested in community service.

Middle school:
Steer him away from TV. Get him engaged in activities that reinforce learning. Academic performance can be improved by encouraging your preteen to join clubs like the Girl/Boy Scouts program, language clubs, chess clubs etc. As a thumb rule, 16-20 hours a week of extra activity should be more than enough. But look out for signs of burnout.

What you select for your child and how long he should work at it is basically decided by the child’s temperament. As a parent, you should closely observe your child and base your decisions on feedback from the child himself.

 

Product License: Private Label Rights

What You Can do:

[YES] Can be branded or edited in any way.

[YES] You can add your name as the Author.

[YES] Your links can be added to the messages

[YES] They can be used as Website/Blog Content.

[YES] They can be published.

[YES] They can be added to Autoresponders/Newsletter.

[YES] Can be compiled into an eBook or Report

[YES] Can be used as eCourse or coaching materials

[YES] Can be used as webinar material

[YES] Can be used as video scripts or any content creation

[YES] Can sell With Private Label Rights/Resale Rights Master Resale Rights

What you CANNOT do:

[NO] Give away for free

[NO] Give away resale rights/private label rights for free

[NO] Can be added to free download sites or free membership sites

Note: PLR Articles are not unique contents as they are being distributed to multiple users.

Thanks for sharing.....Share on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someonePin on Pinterest